One easy way of accessing JIRA over port 80 while keeping it running with its default behavior on port 8080 is to use Apache and mod_proxy.  On a modern Red Hat or Cent OS system this is as easy as:

$ sudo yum install httpd

Next, create the following file:

File:
  /etc/httpd/conf.d/jira.conf
Contents:
  # Send all web traffic to JIRA
  ProxyPass       /   http://localhost:8080/
  ProxyPassReverse    /   http://localhost:8080/

Finally, start up Apache and also set it to run automatically at boot time:

$ sudo /etc/init.d/httpd start
$ sudo chkconfig httpd on

You are all set.  JIRA will serve traffic on port 80 (via Apache) but continue to run as an unprivileged user on port 8080.

Follow up note:

After making the above changes, I realized I also needed to update Jira’s server.xml ({JIRA home}/conf/server.xml).   Find the 8080 connector port entry and add the params:

proxyName="{your server's hostname}"

proxyPort=”80″
For example: (last two params)
——————-

<Connector port="8080"
   maxThreads="150"
   minSpareThreads="25"
   connectionTimeout="20000"
   enableLookups="false"
   maxHttpHeaderSize="8192"
   protocol="HTTP/1.1"
   useBodyEncodingForURI="true"
   redirectPort="8443"
   acceptCount="100"
   disableUploadTimeout="true"
   proxyName="jira.somehost.com"
   proxyPort="80"/>

Bounce JIRA and you should be good to go.

src: https://confluence.atlassian.com/display/JIRA/Changing+JIRA%27s+TCP+Ports
in the page comment by Rick Noelle

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